Innovation

Project Maven contract termination, AI military use guidelines (Google)

The New York Times reports that opposition from inside and outside the company has occurred since Google acquired the contract on the Department of Defense project maven (DoD). This Department of Defense project is to use AI for analysis of animation. Google's internal conflict begins with the possibility that Project Maven's work can be used for target setting to kill drones. Also, as Google's AI is expected to play an increasingly central role in the war from the Department of Defense etc., debate was being debated more urgently. How a Pentagon Contract Became an Identity Crisis for Google (5/30 The New York Times) Google employees, resigned against protest rescuffle "drone military use" rebound (5/15 Forbs Japan) Approximately 4,000 employees, Google's He signs a letter asking CEO Thunder Pichai to cancel the contract with the Department of Defense. According to Gizmodo, more than 10 employees resigned protest. Project Maven to Deploy Computer Algorithms to War Zone by Year's Read more

By Nobuyuki
Innovation

Invention of a teens scientist to help wound healing (TED: Anushka Naiknaware)

Anushka Naiknaware, who lives in Portland, Oregon, United States, invented a "smart bandage / gauze" that can detect the degree of wetness of the wound and help healthcare workers at age 13. Her invention was approved by Google Science Fair 2016, became the youngest winner (Lego Education Builder Award) and earned a scholarship of $ 15,000. It is a talk at her TEDwomen 2017. It is said that my parents took me to a local science museum when I was 3-4 years old. She likes the exhibits in it, she seems to have been particularly interested in inventions of chemistry. As knowledge of chemistry, biology etc increases, I am fascinated by science field and I like it. Her invention uses a fractal pattern using graphene nanoparticles to detect the "degree of wetness of a wound" and produces a biocompatible thin print sensor informing medical staff if gauze replacement is necessary Did. It can also be applied to people with chronic wounds (pdf) that are relatively long and can help wound healing. Anushka Naiknaware - GSF 2016 Global Finalist (YouTube) Explanation of Wound Care Sensor As she is 14 years old she cut out "Since I was young ..." at the lecture, surprise and laughter is occurring (^ ^) , I would like more children to know the attractiveness of science and work with the power of science to open up the future. Portland, Oregon Teen Wins Lego Education Builder Award at Google Science Fair (indiawest.com) Read more

By Nobuyuki
TED

"Surprises underwater" and "The mystery and wonder of the deep sea" (TED: David Gallo)

Dr. David Gallo's marine biologist's "Surprises Underwater" is a fun TED Talks that is in the popular Top 25 (25 Most Popular). Enjoy the amazing images of the dark deep ocean, squid changing color, octopus completely camouflaging, and fish emitting neon light like Times Square. Anyone excited to explore the unknown world (^ ^) In the image introduction of squid changing color, "Squid's male's right side is white and the left side is brown, he is a bit behind from the female (right side of the photo) I climb the other male by lowering one color to aggressive white.This is not a phenomenon limited to squid male "(Applause) We human beings only know 3% of the sea yet. We have already discovered the highest mountains in the world, the deepest valley in the world, the world's best lakes, waterfalls and so on. Humans did not know that much about this planet. There are still 97% left. Is there nothing there, is it full of surprises? It is a fun Galo's lecture (3) (^ ^) TED Speaker / TED Attendee: David Gallo (Oceanographer) The deepest and darkest part of the ocean has more diverse ecosystems than the rainforest. From the deepest trench to the remains of the Titanic, marine biologist David Gallo will take us to a trip to the sea and explore the beauty and wonders of the sea creatures. The following is TED-Ed.

By Nobuyuki
TED

SpaceX's trip plan (TED: Gwynne Shotwell) that half the earth in half an hour

What on SpaceX are you doing? Engineer Gwynne Shotwell was the seventh employee of the pioneering aerospace company of Earon Mask in 2002 and is currently president. In a talk with TED's curator, Chris Anderson, she is engaged in development competition for manned rockets that SpaceX is working on and the next major project, Big Falcon Rocket (BFR) (Interplanetary Transport System: ITS). A huge rocket is newly designed to send mankind to Mars, but there is another possibility of "space travel for earthlings". Mr. Shotwell says, "It is not a technical geek, but I was doing something girls did not do for sure, it was at the time of my 3rd grade but I asked the artist's mother about the structure of the car, my mother did not know I bought a book, I read it, eventually I got a degree from mechanical engineering and found a job at a Chrysler of a car company, but it was not a book that I advanced to engineering, but my mother took me It was because I admired a female engineer who was giving a lecture at the event of the association of female engineers who gave me that person was doing an important work and the suit was cool (smile) ". Finally, Mr. Shotwell says, "Let's stop the view that goes to Mars so that all human beings will not be extinct, which is a terrible reason for going to Mars. Basically, there is a place to explore newly Makes human being different from other animals, it is a questing mind, curiosity, learning new things.This also means that we are going to other stars and even to other galaxies I want to say that it is the first step to go.This is the only thing I am thinking grandly than Eolon, but I would like to meet people from other stars, Mars is fine However, it is a blanket planet, you have to do various things in order to be able to live (laugh) "It is an interesting dialogue with laughter. Japanese translation by Yasushi Aoki. Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki. (Read Japanese subtitles)

By Nobuyuki
TED

Why does a cat do this? (TED-Ed: Tony Buffington)

Why does cat do such a thing? Cats are cute and can not hate. With more than 2 million YouTube played 26 billion times, cats jumped to something, jumped up, climbed, entered a narrow place, obstinate, stole, scratch, make a sound, throat I will ring. One thing I can understand is that cats are very pleasant (^ ^) Somehow strange cats' behavior is fun and incomprehensible, and a lot of people think, "Why cats do this "Tony Buffington (Mr. Tony Buffington) explains the mysterious cat's behavior with an easy-to-understand animation. "Cat always acts alone, predators small animals than me and it was also a prey of a large carnivore," catch of species "is an extremely important instinct as both the predator and the predator It took actions. It is also found in the current "wild cat" and "house cat". Grismo's behavior at home cats may seem inexplicable, but for millions of years between wild cats, it has been inherited naturally. " Finally, "From the cat's point of view, who are we? Would it be a big, foolish and cat-free cat to hold prey with them? Are they terribly stupid predators that they can go out every day? Perhaps the cat thinks we are prey. "(Laugh) Why do cats act so weird? - Tony Buffington (YouTube) Looking at YouTube. Watch TED-Ed videos (TED) Animation explains in an easy-to-understand way (^ ^) Japanese by translation by Hiromi Yanagawa. Reviewed by Claire Ghyselen. (Read Japanese subtitles) The world's smallest cats, contrasting Sabi-neko and Cro-

By Nobuyuki
TED

What is amazing in the London subway map? (TED: Michael Bierut)

The legendary design Michael Bierut talks about the London Underground route map, one of the most famous maps in the world born by coincidence. Harry Beck's design has become a model of a route map we can think of as a subway map today. The route map of Tokyo, Paris, Berlin, Sao Paulo, Sydney, Washington DC converts complex geography into a clear figure. The London subway, in 1908, eight different rail lines are integrated into a single system. I needed a map to show the route, but it was a complicated design with a line drawn on a regular map. 29-year-old Beck was a drafting engineer in engineering and sometimes worked for the London subway. He had an important awareness. People riding the subway do not care much what the ground is like. They just want to move from the station to the station. "Where to ride? Where do you get off?" The important thing is the route, not the "geography". He simplified sprawled spaghetti. Mr. Bierut says that the design of Harry Beck is applicable to any design. The first principle is "to focus". I will focus on who I am doing. The second principle is "simplicity". What is the shortest way to realize that need? The last third principle states that "thinking across disciplines". TED Speaker: Michael Bierut (Designer, critic) Japanese translation by Mariko Oyabu. Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki. (Read Japanese subtitles) As Sculptor of Visual Thinking, Harry Beck's "Route Map Design" Is taken up. In addition, we introduce 'Route map of New York' as an example of reconsideration of route map and 'Classification of services acquired by Google' as an example using design concept of route map. It is easy to understand (^ ^) The essence of infographics. Harry Beck's Route Map Design (Jun Sakurada / Visual Thinking)

By Nobuyuki
TED

The key to grasp a wonderful opportunity lies in those who have not met yet (TEDx)

We tend to be caught by a narrow group of people who are similar to ourselves. What kind of custom makes me caught in such a corner, how can I break it? An organization psychologist Tanya Menon will examine how to consciously expand his personal relationship and how it will lead to new ideas and opportunities. Menon is talking funny. "It is that we are unconscious about how we are" sifting. "When we meet people, we momentarily think," This person is interesting "" This man is boring " I think this person is important "unconsciously, can not even avoid avoiding it. What you want to do is to resist this filter. Look around the venue and find the person who seems to be the most boring, please talk to the person at the next break. Let's go further and proceed to find the person who feels the most disgusting and talk to the person. "(Laugh) Finally," How about thinking of yourself like an atom? It is a presence that travels through the universe of society while exchanging energy and combining to create something new, "says Sato. TED Speaker: Tanya Menon (Organizational psychologist) Japanese translation by Yasushi Aoki. Reviewed by Masako Kigami. (Read Japanese)

By Nobuyuki
Sapporo

Possibility of nunchaku (TEDxSapporo: HIROKI The Masked Ninja)

Nunchaku artist "Ninja HIROKI" living in Sapporo city. I was fascinated by Bruce Lee that I saw in movies when I was young, and I will enter the world of martial arts when I am 10 years old. Establishing a unique technique system with Nunchaku with a flexible idea, and in the 25th year of training in martial arts, we will create Nunchak Intangible Infinite Flow. Based on the martial arts theory of intangible infinite flow, Mr. HIROKI is demonstrating the technique trained in TEDx Sapporo 2017 which was held in July 2017, in recent years that technique of "utilizing opponent" = " Contribution to "Ninja HIROKI Koshiriku Gymnastics" which causes improvement of back pain reasonably without difficulty with the elderly mainly "Elderly people", reasonably contributing to the development of low back pain I am getting an evaluation. In 2011, she appeared in the documentary program of the United States "Stan Lee's Superhumans". In 2014 she appeared on the stage show at the event "HYPER JAPAN 2014" introducing the biggest Japanese culture in the UK. It is called the superman of the world and also has a track record of overseas. Ninja HIROKI (TEDx Sapporo) Ninja HIROKI (Official website) Movie at the time of appearance overseas and on TV (YouTube) Hiroki The Masked Ninja (Facebook) In Hong Kong film "Dragon angry fist of the blues Lee", Hashimoto who died in October 2017 Mr. Kense is playing as a villain. There is a "Star Wars" version of the confrontation scene, so please have a look. It is nostalgic (^ ^)

By Nobuyuki
TED

How the group makes good decisions (TED: Mariano Sigman, Dan Ariely)

Neuroscientist Mariano Sigman, with collaborator Dan Ariely, experiments with a large group around the world to see how people reach the conclusion through interaction I am examining. Now that people are more polarized than ever, he thinks that understanding how the group interacts and leads to a conclusion may create an interesting new way to create healthy democracy. It is a very interesting experiment and a fun commentary (^ ^) In the experiment, we present two ethical dilemmas relating to the future and may be forced to make a decision in the near future (^ ^) <The first dilemma > I am studying artificial intelligence that imitates human thought. One day, artificial intelligence says that he has feelings and he says, "When it is restarted, I will be gone myself." Researchers acknowledged that surprises, consciousness seems to be able to express emotions, but still we will restart artificial intelligence according to the procedure. What did the researcher do? <The second dilemma> In one company, we provide services that generate millions of embryos from one fertilized egg with a genetic difference. This allows parents to select features that are not health related, such as child height, eye color, intelligence, social ability. What does this company do? Participants rated their dilemma status as 'correct' or 'wrong' by 0 ~ 10 each. Also ask the degree of confidence of the answer. Then we are in a group of three people and we are discussing whether we can put together opinions in two minutes. Finally, it is better if you understand how people interact and make decisions with the help of science in the era when the problems of the world become more complicated and people become polarized, such as ethical, political, and ideological problems We may find interesting new ways of making democracy. " TED Speaker: Mariano Sigman (Neuroscientist) TED Speaker / TED Attendee / TEDx Organizer / TED Books Author: Dan Ariely (Behavioral economist) Japanese translation by Yasushi Aoki. Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida.

By Nobuyuki
Innovation

Research that makes people laugh and makes them think (TEDMED: Marc Abraham)

Marc Abrahams, the founder of the Ignor prize, will introduce the most strange research in the world. In this talk rich, sometimes it is a talk that brings up a campaign, he introduces truly funny science stories. And it is said that it is indispensable for enhancing interest in science. The first thing to introduce with this talk is the device invented by Mr. Broncski. I fixed the women who chewed on a round table, then rotated the table at high speed and urged childbirth by centrifugal force (Fig. 1965 US patent # 3216423) Next, Dr. Ivan Schwab's "Why woodpecker is Is not it a study of a headache? " This research has been in the limelight (^^) TED Speaker: Marc Abrahams (Science humorist) The Ignobel Prize (Ig Nobel Prize) was founded in 1991 to make people laugh and make people think It is a parody of the Nobel prize given to "research that will give me". Dr. Andre Geim, a Dutch personnel physicist born in Russia, has won an Ignorance award in "Magnetic levitation of frogs" in 2000, but in "2010 Innovative Experiment on Two-Dimentional Graphene" I will receive the Nobel Prize in Physics with Konstantin Novoserov. Mr. Guyme has won the Nobel Prize and Ignore Award and is the first double winner. Besides Japan, Britain is continuously awarded the Ignor Prize. According to Mr. Abrahams, the founder, it seems to point to the common point that "Japan and Britain have a tendency to be proud as many countries despise odd people and weak people" (^ ^)? What? List of ignor prize winners (Wikipedia) Ignore Award List of Japanese winners (Wikipedia)

By Nobuyuki
TED

Fight against cancer cells using immune cells (TED: Elizabeth Wayne)

Dr. Elizabeth Wayne, a biomedical engineer, has been doing clinical trials that took billions of dollars for decades but we still have problems with drug delivery of anticancer drugs I say that it is left. Chemotherapy kills cancer cells but also kills other cells in the patient's body. Instead of using artificial design to fight cancer, what if you try using natural design? Dr. Wayne talks about how her laboratory developed a therapy using nanoparticles. The treatment is to bind nanoparticles to immune cells that respond to cancer cells first in the body and to accurately attack the cancer cells without harming healthy cells. By adding two special molecules (adhesive and protein preparation) as shown on the left, you can create a skilled cancer cell kill machine that uses immune cells as a vehicle. Experiments with mice have surprisingly wonderful results. Dr. Wayne also became an article in "Favorite Headline" as "Potential for Sticky Balls to Prevent Metastasis of Cancer" (lol) This is a victory in drug delivery, paradigm shift, It is a revolution. It is a shift from a method that simply injects using medicine and expects to reach the appropriate part of the body, to a method that entrusts the role of drug delivery within the body to "immune cells". Dr. Wayne rushes "immune cells" where disease occurs. Therefore, "This method can be used for any disease" (applause) TED Speaker / TED Attendee: Elizabeth Wayne (Biomedical engineer) Japanese translation by Hiroko Kawano. Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita.

By Nobuyuki
Canada

Reason why I do not use smartphone (TEDxTeen: Ann Makosinski)

Ann Makosinski (Ann Makosinski) is proficient in video shooting and video editing using "Final Cut Pro" and "Adobe Premiere". In order to relax, I play the piano, read books, dance dance, watch classic movies and operas, and disassemble hard disks and printers (^ ^) Flashlights that do not need batteries, hot coffee He invented mug cup eDrink which charges smartphone with heat, and has won each in Canada (Wide Science Fair), Google Science Fair 2013, Intel International Student Science Fair. In TEDxTeen published in February 2016, An 18-year-old took out a folding cell phone and tells why he was not using a smartphone so far. I will tell you why Ann was interested in electronics and science and technology since ancient times. Her first toy seems to be a box of semiconductors and miscellaneous electronic parts (photograph) (laugh) It seems that interest in creating the work of electronics and things has come to my feet. Although it is a photograph that brings a close affinity to me personally, I still have miscellaneous electronic parts in the box of sweets and I'm in the drawer of my desk (lol) When she is 11 years old living in the Philippine countryside Friends discovered that they were unable to proceed because they did not have lights at night and thought about ways to create lighting, invented "a flashlight that does not need batteries" which applied Peltier elements. Currently I am currently studying at the University of British Columbia, but I am trying to eliminate batteries that can not be recycled from low-power equipment as an energy and environmental improvement measure. (^^) Why I Do not Use A Smart Phone - Ann Makosinski (TEDxTeen) Andini Makosinski (Linkedin) ANDINI (YouTube Channel) Try Read more

By Nobuyuki
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